North Korea

Chollima Steel Complex of North Korea


Dear Reader,
Along the storyline of my trip to North Korea, our tour eventually took us to Namp’o, West seaport city located on the Taedong River.
Here we stopped for a visit at the Chollima Steel Complex, located in Nampo, North Korea.

Chollima Steelworks in Nampo North Korea Stanito

Originally built by the Japanese in the 1940’s, this photo is just a glance of North Korean steel industry which has been treasured dearly by all three DPRK leaders.

Chollima Steel work Nampo Stanito

This was an important stop during our tour as this complex proves vital for the ongoing construction and building in the main cities of North Korea and it provides a interesting idea of how the country deals with its industry demands and needs. The complex boasts a number of hangar-sized buildings, machine tools, lathes and so on that the workers use to make shaped steel, turbine components, and other products.

Chollima steel factory Stanito

We could only visit the ground floor of the production and for such we were given safety helmets

Stanito yellow helmet Chollima

Chollima worker Nampo

Like other symbolic places in North Korea, the Chollima Complex has a particular significance for people, no only because the Kims paid many visits to this heavy industry site, but also because it represents the birthplace of the Chollima movement: the State sponsored movement that intends to promote rapid economic growth and hard work under the guidance of Kim Il-Sung.

As we will continue to go through Stanito’s adventure in North Korea, you will notice that in many places there are vivid propaganda posters aiming to portray the Kims as pioneers, promoters of hard work, spiritual guides, etc.
Below is the poster we found near the Chollima Complex, portraying Kim Il-Sung probably providing his expertise on how to work really hard, how to work with steel, agriculture, etc. In few words showing and teaching people about the art of hard work and dedication.

Chollima propaganda North Korea

More on the Propaganda on my next post. Stay tuned, Dear Reader.

4 comments

    1. Hello Rhys,
      mm not really. Technically you’re very restricted when taking photos in NK but in this particular spot there was no limitations or warnings. Normally you have a list of don’t, but this steel complex was very relaxed.

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