Japan Normal Travels

The Crowded Shibuya Crossing


Dear Reader,
If you come to Tokyo, make sure you have some time to cross the streets of the famous intersection outside Shibuya station. It would be a shame to come to Tokyo and miss it 🙂

Shibuya_Crossing_Tokyo_Stanito
This is the first photo I took upon my arrival at Shibuya, not yet pick time.

At any given time of the year, whether on sunny afternoons or cold evenings, the surrounding area is packed with shoppers, students, young couples and commuters. Giant video screens and neon and cool Japanese writings will certainly give you the feeling of “Wow, I’m in Tokyo!”

Shibuya_Crossing_Tokyo_Stanito1

So why is it so famous? Basically because it is said to be the busiest pedestrian crossing in the world. It is surrounded by tall buildings with giant screens and ads vying for pedestrians’ attention, this pedestrian crossing is pass through by an estimated 500,000 people each day, with roughly 3,000 pedestrians crossing every time the lights change during peak hours, making it one of the flashiest and most popular places to advertise in Japan.

Shibuya_Crossing_Tokyo_Stanito2
A rare moment with the crossing almost empty!

After experimenting this monumental crossing phase, why not go pay a visit to Hachiko?

A tired Stanito standing next to Hachiko statue, Tokyo's most famous pooch, Hachikō. This Akita dog came to Shibuya Station everyday to meet his master, a professor, returning from work. The professor died in 1925, but Hachikō kept coming to the station until his own death 10 years later. The story became legend and a small statue was erected in the dog’s memory in front of Shibuya Station.
A tired Stanito standing next to Hachiko statue, Tokyo’s most famous pooch, Hachikō. This Akita dog came to Shibuya Station everyday to meet his master, a professor, returning from work. The professor died in 1925, but Hachikō kept coming to the station until his own death 10 years later. The story became legend (and a movie) and a small statue was erected in the dog’s memory in front of Shibuya Station.

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